Hope Springs Eternal March 07 2019

Western timing as expressed in the Julian calendar for the Northern Hemisphere defines the spring season as beginning on the spring equinox (March 20th this year). This is a good reflection of how western thought operates. We don't acknowledge spring until it is way obvious. The grass is greening, the birds are chirping, and the flowers are blooming. The Asian calendar, however, is based on the lunar cycle and marks the spring season a little differently. It focuses on that time when, though there might be a foot of snow on the ground and a howling wind, an organic shift has occurred. Seeds, still well below the surface, are beginning to germinate. Nature begins its work looking towards the time when a plant will manifest and flower. The lunar calendar recognizes the invisible change as opposed to the manifestation of this energetic shift.

 

Western medical thought appears to approach disease in a similar way to the Julian calendar creators. Waiting for a disease to manifest before noticing it might mean that we have waited too long. A cancerous activity, for example, is more easily dealt with if it is detected and treated in an earlier stage than when it has become a tumor. An allergy to pollens is better addressed sooner in the body's response as opposed to later when the internal confusion has manifested.

 

Perhaps you have already noticed the switch in seasonal momentum. The weather is subtly different and light is returning. There is a warmth in the air that beckons even though there are still chilly mornings and snowy evenings. This shift takes place a good deal sooner than the Julian calendar marker that we are so used to. Perhaps in your day-to-day there has been a momentum shift as well. Spring fever has its beginnings much sooner than the vernal equinox. Romantic notions have already come into consciousness or did we miss the meaning of Valentine's Day? Artists find themselves planting seeds for new creations. Business people start new ideas for growth and innovation.

 

As you begin to notice the shift, you can utilize this energy in your life. For new growth in our figurative and literal garden, we must plant the seeds before they can grow and prosper. Before there can be a new song, a new outlet for creativity, or a new business plan, one must plant the seed and give birth to the idea. This is the time for inspiration. There is a power available now that you can tap into. Take long walks and open yourself to new ideas. Let loose of stubborn tendencies. Allow for new growth and flexibility in areas not considered before.

 

During the spring there is an innate tension between order and chaos. New activities inherently contain a certain amount of fear and there is no guarantee about the outcome. Taking risks and playing in new arenas are how we evolve and are important criteria to make the learning truly transformative.

 

Chinese herbs work on subtle levels that go beyond the physical. If you are seeking balance, consider one of the OHCO formulas to strengthen and nourish.